Student newspaper of Strath Haven High School

Panther Press

Student newspaper of Strath Haven High School

Panther Press

Student newspaper of Strath Haven High School

Panther Press

Panther Playlist

GSA returns to health classes

After a hiatus last year, GSA students returned to sophomore health classes in the fall semester to present on LGBTQ+ topics.

Senior Francesca Clark, co-president of the Gender and Sexuality Alliance (GSA), decided to bring back GSA peer education to sophomore health classes after last year’s GSA leaders decided not to visit the health classes.

According to Clark, the decision to suspend the visits last year was not made by all members of the club.

“That decision wasn’t really talked about with GSA, and I was a junior leader last year,” Clark said.

Clark emphasized the importance of the visits, and how students’ learning experiences change when being taught by fellow students.

“I think it’s really important to go more in-depth about sexuality and all of that that the curriculum doesn’t allow you to do normally,” Clark said. “Peer education is like a huge part of learning, and it’s more hands-on, it allows people to pay more attention and feel more connected to what they’re learning. We felt really, really good about it. We were really happy that we started it up again, instead of just letting it not happen and leaving it all on the teachers.”

GSA Advisor and English Teacher Mr. Matthew Morris agrees with Clark. He helped connect the health teachers and the students to work out a plan of action.

“The GSA peer education is really directed by the club, and several people in the club this year felt really strongly about bringing it back, and the health teachers were very into it,” Morris said.

Sophomore Sonya Blum found the GSA visits to be informative.

“I think some definitions were clarified,” she said. “And I think I learned, it was solidified, what is respectful and not respectful.”

Clark notes the lack of discussion around many queer topics, such as preventative measures for queer sex. She hopes that the GSA presentations will spark further amendments to the curriculum and improve representation of the LGBTQ+ community.

“When it comes to queer relationships, the curriculum is not doing its best to teach students,” Clark said.

GSA talks are also a way for students to learn more about what GSA does and make the club’s resources more accessible.

“GSA is about education, but it’s also about support, community support for each other, and about advocacy,” Morris said.

The presentations can help to clear misconceptions about GSA.

“I think a lot of people don’t really think of GSA as a club that is productive per se, they kind of just think it’s a hangout club for the weird kids,” Clark said. “But it’s not. There’s a lot of people in it, and it’s really important.”

Clark, Morris, and Blum felt there was positive engagement during the talks.

“I think that if anyone in the class wasn’t engaged, it wasn’t about the lack of effort on GSA’s part,” Blum said. “I think that the leaders did a great job speaking, and I think that they were respectful and well-spoken.”

Morris commends the time and effort GSA student leaders put into the presentations.

“I sat in on one of the sessions, and I think it went pretty well,” Morris said. “People paid good attention and participated really actively. The students who ran the education session had done a lot of pre-work to get ready for it and updating it even from last time that it was run, and I think that paid off.”

There is much to look forward to for sophomores taking health in the spring.

“I think that we want to include more interactive activities. We wanted to do a project where we would create pronoun pins where you would make your own pronoun pin,” Clark said. “We had a button press and everything, but it broke so we couldn’t use it. So, hopefully, we can add that in this semester.”

Leave a Comment
About the Contributor
Kaitlyn Ho ’26
Kaitlyn Ho ’26, Managing Editor of Web
Kaitlyn Ho is the current managing editor of web and the health and sciences editor of The Panther Press. Her first article was on the German Exchange Students. There was no turning back after that. She loves to learn about communicating complex science in simple ways, reading, dancing, artificial intelligence, and playing (badly) the piano and cello. Her future self can confirm that she will laugh at and enjoy every single thing her past self wrote.
Donate to Panther Press
$250
$600
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of The Panther Press. Contributions allow us to cover our website hosting costs, continue to print new issues, fund staff training, and purchase equipment.

More to Discover
Donate to Panther Press
$250
$600
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

We encourage reader comments and opinions on the content posted on The Panther Press and its social media accounts. In order to keep the discussions aligned with the purpose of our student publications, we ask commenters to follow the following guidelines. 1) Different viewpoints and opinions are welcome, but comments must demonstrate respect. Profanity, insults, spam, personal attacks, bullying language, hate speech, and language demonstrating intolerance are unacceptable. 2) Comments will be managed by the Social Media Editor and Editors in Chief, with support from the adviser. Inappropriate comments will be removed. 3) On stories and social media, please keep comments brief. If you would like to elaborate on your opinion, we encourage you to submit a guest commentary or letter to the editor. 4) The Panther Press does not permit anonymous comments on stories posted to our website. All comment postings require a verified email address. Email addresses will not be displayed but will be used to confirm your comments.
All Panther Press Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *