The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.

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Who Doesn’t Love Reading Subtitles?

Olivia Spring, '17, Staff Writer

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If you’re like me then you LOVE to binge watch television shows on Netflix. here is nothing better than procrastinating on homework during the last few weeks of school, so Netflix is the cure all of end of the year school feels. But if you’re also like me then you have a hard time staying interested in a show that is slow paced and has a billion seasons *cough* Grey’s Anatomy *cough*. So more than likely, you have watched all the TV shows possible that fit your criteria of an interesting, quick paced TV show that is available to stream. However, some of the best gems Netflix has to offer are hidden in a place that many people don’t often think to look: the foreign TV show section. Many people have preconceived notions that foreign films and TV shows are boring and pointless. Contrary to these beliefs, one of my all time favorite TV shows is in Portuguese. It is called 3%.

3% is a pure masterpiece that was created by Netflix in 2016. Set in a dystopian society, it details the lives of a group of twenty year olds who are competing against each other to reach a heaven-like life on the Off- shore, an island that contains only the best 3% of the society’s population. The other 97% of the people live in complete pov- erty together on the mainland. Once a person turns 20, they have the chance to compete against each other on challenging tests, which are emotionally, mentally, and physically draining. At the end of these tests, only 3% of the original competing group re- mains and they are given a place to live on the Offshore. When I first saw this show, I was skeptical, mainly because it was in Portuguese and looked like any other dystopian fiction plot line. However, I was quickly proven completely wrong. The show’s plot was incredibly well done, and more importantly it was creative while still being believable. There were plot twists, around every corner that kept me hooked, and the character development allowed
me to develop sympathy with several characters, while also despising others.The best part of this dystopian show, in my opinion, is the fact that there are only eight episodes in the first season. As of right now, there is only one season released on Netflix, but the creators planned it out very well so that there could certainly be another season to come in the near future. The fact that there are not too many episodes is great because this allows the show to move at a faster pace, which I very much enjoy. Unlike long drawn out binge shows, this program keeps your attention the entire season. The fault of shows like Gray’s Anatomy is that viewers are left being forced into watching upwards of twenty episodes in order to survive a single season. The deep, independent characters and dynamic plot create a show that hooks viewers, holds their attention, and keeps them surprised and wanting more. 3% accomplishes more than a season of one of those drawn out shows in merely eight episodes. If you are like me and al- ways desperately searching for your next binge-worthy show, throw on your reading glasses and check out 3%.

The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.
Who Doesn’t Love Reading Subtitles?