The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.

Panther Press

  • Junior Prom on 4/22!

  • Varsity Arts Ceremony on 4/21

Rejection: Putting Yourself First

Helen Qi & Madison Snyder, ‘17, Staff Writers

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






We all know rejection is inevitable– it’s bound to happen to each and every one of us in our lifetime. With final college decisions fast approaching for the majority of seniors at the end of March, rejection in all forms is an issue on people’s minds. The feeling of hurt and potential embarrassment from being rejected is enough to make people fearful or even tentative when pursuing new things or something outside of the social norm. Haven guidance counselor Ms. Salvage has an up close look at how rejection affects students saying, “Of course rejection is painful and stings the ego but it is also inevitable if you strive for high goals. The key is knowing that how you react is actually a choice that you can make.” Whether it’s in the form of social rejection or a college rejection, it’s never fun to deal with and some level of hurt is always involved, but ignoring the social pressures that are amplified over social media can enable you to better handle rejection.

After talking to Haven students, there was a general consensus that the social aspect of rejection plays a large part in the ultimate fear of being rejected. Seniors in particular stated that they were more worried about the potential reactions of their friends and families towards their college rejections than their own personal feelings. The culture of college shaming plays a huge part in coping with rejection, and the fact that people seem to care more about what others think rather than their own feelings demonstrates how deranged this system is. In today’s world, technology’s central role in daily life means that rejections often become public knowledge extremely quickly when shared. Our acceptances and accomplishments become front and center on social media. Senior Justin Snyder states, “I feel like you have to be rejected to one school to get that full college experience.”

Being fearful of this rejection can become problematic when it inhibits you from going after something you want. Out of the Haven students interviewed, over half expressed their hesitancy to apply to a dream school or go out for a team due to the potential of failure. The tremendous courage it takes at times to pursue something you want often goes unrecognized. Taking a chance despite the threat of failure means at least you can live with the outcome and not have to think “what if” in the future. As much as we hate hearing it from adults, everything does happen for a reason. In the words of Alex Vieira ‘17, “rejection means that you don’t match to whatever rejected you. It’s important to remember that you don’t owe it to them to be anyone but yourself.”

Guidance Counselor Ms. Salvage shares her experience with rejection explaining, “You can take comfort in the knowledge that this path will have benefits somewhere down the line that maybe you can’t see right now. After graduating from my first choice, Early Decision college with a 3.8 GPA and a bachelor’s degree in psychology, I applied to nine graduate programs and I got rejected from all 8 PhD. programs and was only accepted at my back up plan for the M.S.Ed. degree. Although I was shocked and upset initially, I decided I would see how it went and knew I could at least identify a silver lining of being closer to home, knowing that it was not a rejection of me as a person or a reflection on my ability or potential.” After coming to terms with these decision,s Ms. Salvage reveals that this rejection set her on a path where she discovered school psychology stating, “I never would have found a job that I love as much if I had not been rejected by all of the PhD. programs.”

This month and in the upcoming years for the underclassman, avoid thinking of rejection as a barrier in the way. Instead, recognize that doing what is best for you should be the first and foremost focus from high school to college to beyond. For those facing eminent college decisions and other rejection through life, Ms. Salvage advises, “I encourage any students struggling to talk to their counselor or family which can help you move past the pain and loss. Have hope; there are many, many paths to success!”

The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.
Rejection: Putting Yourself First