The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.

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Women to Remember This Women’s History Month

Maddie Marks, '19, Editor

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As Maya Angelou once said, “How important is it for us to recognize our heroes and she-roes!” Since the dawn of the fight for women’s rights up until the present day, women leaders from all backgrounds have risen above the discrimination to make their voices heard. And all of these women, especially those with lesser known names, deserve a tribute to all of their work in supporting the movement for equality. With the recent threats and exposure of human right weaknesses in America, it is important to look back at those who inspired movements for equality.

Jaha Dukureh is a Gambian activist working to end female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM is a surprisingly common practice that removes female parts from the body. Jaha Dukureh currently does inspiring work to raise awareness about FGM in an effort to stop the practice. She promoted the Obama administration with a petition to begin a study on the problem of female genital mutilation after it received over 220,000 signatures.

Christiana Figueres is a Costa Rican diplomat who negotiated the famous Paris agreement in 2015 after being appointed the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2010. The Paris agreement requires around 200 countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions alongside making an effort to address environmental issues. She has received many awards and recognitions for her work in environmental protection, including the Legion of Honor of France and the Grand Medal of the City of Paris.

Mona Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician in who works in Flint, Michigan. She was the first person to recognize that the health problems in the children of Flint were directly correlated to the high levels of lead in the water. She called attention to the contamination, resulting in national uproar and the persecution of many officials. She now works as a doctor to take care of the affected children and as an activist to continuously bring awareness to the water crisis.

Ibtihaj Muhammad was the first woman from the United States to compete in the Olympic Games wearing a hijab, which took place at the Rio Olympics in 2016. She won a bronze medal in her event, saber, and is ranked number seven in the world individually. She serves on the U.S. Department of State’s Empowering Women and Girls Through Sport Initiative, and is also an advocate for the rights of American Muslims.

Vivienne Westwood is a punk fashion designer from England. Her designs were first created for the band Sex Pistols, but she then moved on to open up her own shop called Let It Rock, which she later renamed Sex. Many of her designs touched on the ideas of civil rights and helping the environment, and she raised a lot of money through her designs for various charities. She has won many awards for her work, such as the Prince Philip Designers Prize and the Queen’s Export Award, among others.

Throughout Women’s History Month this year, it’s important to remember these women, in addition to many others who often go unnamed when thinking about the movement for equality. Women’s rights are human rights, and the racial tension and racism in the world is not to be overlooked. The Women’s March this January proved the potential women have to drive change. No matter their backgrounds, women are inspiring progress; never forget that a group of strong women is an invincible powerhouse ready to fight for change.

The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.
Women to Remember This Women’s History Month