The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.

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Foreign Films to See

Sofia Sheehan, '17, Editor

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This year has been great for foreign films between the releases of the films Neruda, Toni Erdmann, Julieta, Salesman, and Elle. However, there are many people who will still refuse to watch a film with subtitles. This is most definitely a huge mistake. Watching foreign films can put people in touch with so many different cultures that one might not have otherwise known much about. Appreciating foreign film is a crutial step in connecting people all around the world and starting to better understand different types of people. Here are a list of a few foreign flicks to help everyone realize how awesome and inspirational foreign films can be:

Amelie- This is probably the most delightful film on the list and it is sure to put a smile on your face. Jean Pierre Jeunet’s film stars a young Audrey Tautou as Amelie, a young girl who strives to help all the people around her but cannot help herself. When you are at a loss with humanity (considering all the things that happened in 2016), Amelie Poulain will show you that there are still good people making a difference in their own quirky way. Amelie has inspired countless films as well as the Travelocity gnome commercials and though it lost the Academy Award, it is sure to win your heart.

Mustang- This one may be my favorite on the list. This Turkish-French film released by first time director Denis Gamze Erguven in 2015 tells the story of five sisters living in a small Turkish village. After being seen playing on the beach with other boys, their grandmother and uncle force them to stay in their house. It seems like a grim story of female imprisonment but it is filled with funny, lighthearted, and adventurous moments as well. While it feels like the Turkish Virgin Suicides, the director herself will tell you that the plot itself most closely resembles Escape from Alcatraz. This is by far the best depiction of sisterhood I have ever seen in a film and was recognized at the Cannes Film Festival and the Academy Awards as one of the best films of the year. Now that Turkey is facing political turmoil, it’s more important than ever to get acquainted with the culture of some of its people.

Pan’s Labyrinth- Guillermo del Toro has been scaring American audiences for years, but it is this Spanish language film that is his best. In 1930s Spain (after Franco has won the Spanish Civil War), a young girl is forced to move to the Spanish countryside after her mother marries a Franco supporting general. While there, she is visited by a faun in the night who makes her go on missions for him. This adult Narnia-like tale mixes the horrors of fascism and war in with the horrors of the magical creatures that live around us. Accompanied by Javier Navarrete’s haunting score, Pan’s Labyrinth will grip you until the very end. Just one tip: don’t watch it at night.

T h e Secret in their Eyes- This is probably one of the best murder mysteries of all time. From Argentina, it stars Ricardo Darin as an ex detective revisiting a case of a young wife being raped and murdered for a book he is writing. Soon, old feelings rise and he begins to wonder about the truth of the story he had tried for years to forget. It won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2010. It will shock and beguile you in equal measure as what starts as a whodunit mystery ends as a haunting account of how we punish societies criminals.

The Lives of Others- For those who do not know much about the East German history of secret police or you have a test on it tomorrow, this is the movie to watch. It stars a middle-aged, highly respected Stasi who accepts a job to record and spy on a German playwright with suspected western sympathies. As he spends more time on the job, he becomes attached to the writer and his lover and begins questioning the morality of what he is doing to these people. This also won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2007 and is sure to make you question whether our laws really operate on morality.

Shall We Dance- This one is lesser known, and in my opinion, very neglected by the world. Please do not confuse this with the Richard Gere and Jennifer Lopez remake of this which is a terrible waste of time. It follows a middle aged Japanese businessman. His marriage is strained and he begins to find comfort in the arms of another woman. Don’t worry. It’s only on the dance floor. Through the process of learning how to ballroom dance, he lets go off his quiet demeanor and begins to really enjoy his life with his family again. Watch this one with your family (it’s on Netflix) and try not to get inspired to learn to ballroom dance.

The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.
Foreign Films to See