The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.

Panther Press

  • Junior Prom on 4/22!

  • Varsity Arts Ceremony on 4/21

Why Did Haven March?

Claire Van Duyne, '17 & Martine Leech, '17, Editor-In-Chief & Staff Writer

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Laura Ritter Wiseman, ‘17: I felt like it was a rare opportunity to really be a part of history and it also gave me a comforting feeling being around so many people who were not okay with what Trump stands for.

Serafina Thomas, ‘17: As a seventeen year old girl I have been fortunate to not have had much experience from the injustice commonly imparted on women’s bodies and from the inequalities between sexes. So, I march for my future, I march for the women who have felt this obstruction, and the women who are silenced by it. That is why I marched on January 21st.

Lizzie King, ‘17: I marched that past weekend to show the government that woman and their rights cannot be ignored.

Olivia Spring, ‘17: I marched to stand with all the women and men in the world who are affected by gender inequality, this including the LGBT community. I also marched to end the discussion against abortion because I believe there is no reason why men in Washington should be able to take away my right to decide what to do with my own body.

Kacy Hafertepe, ‘17: I marched because I believe in standing up for women’s rights and organizations. I can only hope that things continue to get better for the women of future generations, and we have to make a stand now in order to secure that change.

Julia Gyourko, ’17: I marched because I thought that it was important to send a message to the incoming administration that we want an inclusive and safe government for all people. In the wake of the misogyny and bigotry that helped garner them support, I felt that I had a responsibility to be proactive, and not reactive, to any potential attempts to degrade and demoralize any group in this country. I wanted to speak up.

Matt Murray, ’17: I marched to show that the threat of women’s rights being impeded on is a threat to freedom, or which both men and women need to stand against.

Maia Messaiger, ’16: I marched in Boston because I feel that tit is my responsibility as a member of a democracy to make sure that my opinions are heard no matter who is in office. I marched for women’s, LGBT+, and reproductive rights, to show my support of healthcare for all, and for equality. I marched to show that I would not be passive to many of the changes the new administration has promised. Finally, I marched because I feel that history is being made and I was excited to be a part of it

Anna Morreale, ’17: I marched because we have someone who condones sexual assault in the White House and not speaking or acting would be a crime against little girls growing up in a culture normalizing assault. I want young girls to know that no one has a right to their body. And because I’m genuinely afraid that women will be forced to return to coat hanger abortions and I’m at an age where this directly affects me and my peers.

Zoe Brown, ’17: I think my short answer is that this is too big not to stand up for. I have a responsibility as a woman and a person with two sisters and a mother and some incredible female friends and just a member of society to not be idle about bigotry especially when it’s so blatant and close to home. People need to unite in the face of injustice and this was a perfect opportunity to do so.

Katrina Bernaus, ’17: My mom and I marched because neither of us were able to vote but we wanted to make sure that our voices were heard, and continue to be heard over the next four years. As a women I feel afraid to lose my reproductive rights and for the continuation of the rape culture perpetrated by our president’s history of degradation of women and even sexual assault. I believe that in a time when our leader is attempting to divide us by fear it is necessary for us to unite and stand up for all of our rights.

Martine Leech, ‘17: I march because more than anything, I felt like I needed to support the women in this country and the world who are less fortunate than I. It was and more importantly still is an essential cause that we, as young people, need to focus our attention onto. The march was just the very first step.

Inez Jacobs-Hinton, ‘18: I marched because women are at risk now and I feel like if I didn’t march for myself and other women, who was going to do it?

Emma Lee and Elisa Kruse, ‘18: We marched in support for planned parenthood and equal rights for all people. For us, the March was to support others, rather than denounce our new President. We had a great time and really felt united with everyone there.

The student newspaper of Strath Haven High School. The Panther Press is first and foremost a reflection of the opinions and interests of the student body. For this reason, we do not publish any anonymous or teacher-written submissions, and we do not discriminate against any ideology or political opinion. While we are bound by school policy (and funding), we will not render any article neutral, although individual points may be edited for obscene or inflammatory content. Finally, the articles published in the Panther Press do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or advisors.
Why Did Haven March?